Science DMZ is Focus of Latest Library of Network Training Videos


ESnet, Network Startup Resource Center Combine Expertise to Spread the Word

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The Network Startup Resource Center and ESnet have created a Science DMZ video library.

For members of the established research and education (R&E) networking community, attending conferences or sitting in on workshop sessions is the normal way to learn about the latest equipment, architecture, tools and technologies.

But for network engineers striving to establish basic R&E infrastructure where bandwidth and other resources are scarce, the University of Oregon’s Network Startup Resource Center (NSRC) is often the primary information conduit. NSRC staff travel to emerging nations in Africa, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and South America where they hold intensive hands-on training courses combined with direct engineering assistance to bring institutions up to speed.

And for the second time in a year, ESnet and the NSRC have produced and released a library of short explanatory videos to help network engineers around the world gain basic knowledge, set up basic systems and drill down into areas of specific interest. In December, 15 videos detailing the Science DMZ network architecture were posted, covering the background and structure, specific designs, and techniques and technology.

The Science DMZ video library complements the 29-video perfSONAR library released in July 2016.

“The goal is to make the information more accessible to networking staff, in the U.S. and particularly in emerging economic areas where institutions are trying to bootstrap a research network,” said ESnet Network Engineer Eli Dart, who developed the Science DMZ concept with Brent Draney of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). Both ESnet and NERSC are DOE Office of Science User Facilities managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Read the full story.

How the World’s Fastest Science Network Was Built

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Created in 1986, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance network built to support unclassified science research. ESnet connects more than 40 DOE research sites—including the entire National Laboratory system, supercomputing facilities and major scientific instruments—as well as hundreds of other science networks around the world and the Internet.

Funded by DOE’s Office of Science and managed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), ESnet moves about 51  petabytes of scientific data every month. This is a 13-step guide about how ESnet has evolved over 30 years.

Step 1: When fusion energy scientists inherit a cast-off supercomputer, add 4 dialup modems so the people at the Princeton lab can log in. (1975)

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Step 2: When landlines prove too unreliable, upgrade to satellites! Data screams through space. (1981)

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Step 3: Whose network is best? High Energy Physics (HEPnet)? Fusion Physics (MFEnet)?  Why argue? Merge them into one-Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)-run by the Department of Energy!  Go ESnet! (1986)

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Step 4: Make it even faster with DUAL Satellite links! We’re talking 56 kilobits per second! Except for the Princeton fusion scientists – they get 112 Kbps! (1987)

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Step 5:  Whoa, when an upgrade to 1.5 MEGAbits per second isn’t enough, add ATM (not the money machine, but Asynchronous Transfer Mode) to get more bang for your buck. (1995)

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Step 6: Duty now for the future—roll out the very first IPv6 address to ensure there will be enough Internet addresses for decades to come. (2000)

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Step 7: Crank up the fastest links in the network to 10 GIGAbits per second—16 times faster than the old gear—a two-generation leap in network upgrades at one time. (2003)

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Step 8: Work with other networks to develop really cool tools, like the perfSONAR toolkit for measuring and improving end-to-end network performance and OSCARS (On-Demand Secure Circuit and Advance Reservation), so you can reserve a high-speed, end-to-end connection to make sure your data is delivered on time. (2006)

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Step 9: Why just rent fiber? Pick up your own dark fiber network at a bargain price for future expansion. In the meantime, boost your bandwidth to 100G for everyone. (2012)

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Step 10: Here’s a cool idea, come up with a new network design so that scientists moving REALLY BIG DATASETS can safely avoid institutional firewalls, call it the Science DMZ, and get research moving faster at universities around the country. (2012)

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Step 11: We’re all in this science thing together, so let’s build faster ties to Europe. ESnet adds three 100G lines (and a backup 40G link) to connect researchers in the U.S. and Europe. (2014)

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Step 12: 100G is fast, but it’s time to get ready for 400G. To pave the way, ESnet installs a production 400G network between facilities in Berkeley and Oakland, Calif., and even provides a 400G testbed so network engineers can get up to speed on the technology. (2015)

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Step 13: Celebrate 30 years as a research and education network leader, but keep looking forward to the next level. (2016)

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BioTeam and ESnet Partner on Science DMZ Webinar


BioTeam and ESnet are partnering to offer a webinar on the Science DMZ architectural paradigm.  While streamlining a network design to facilitate “friction free” research paths, the Science DMZ has been widely adopted by the research and education (R&E) community and is being implemented at many locations around the world.  Using this approach, the task of data mobility becomes less of a mystery, and more of a routine part of scientific networks.  

This event will occur on Monday, May 18th, between 2pm and 4pm EDT and is open to the general public.  We would like to encourage network operators and researchers (including, but not limited to, life science researchers) to attend this no-cost event.  For complete information on registration and logistical details, visit: http://bioteam.net/2015/04/science-dmz-101/. Registration will close when the number of registration slots has been exhausted.

BioTeam is a high-performance consulting practice. They are dedicated to delivering objective, technology agnostic solutions to life science researchers by leveraging technologies customized for scientific objectives.

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified network built to support scientific research. ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, and peers with over 140 research and commercial networks.

Berkeley Lab Staff to Present Super-facility Science Model at Internet2 Conference


Berkeley Lab staff from five divisions will share their expertise in a panel discussion on “Creating Super-facilities: a Coupled Facility Model for Data-Intensive Science at the Internet2 Global Summit to be held April 26-30 in Washington, D.C. The panel was organized by Lauren Rotman of ESnet and includes Alexander Hexemer of the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Craig Tull of CRD, David Skinner of NERSC and Rune Stromsness of the IT Division.

The session will highlight the concept of a coupled science facility or “super-facility,” a new model that links together experimental facilities like the ALS with computing facilities like NERSC via a Science DMZ architecture and advanced workflow and analysis software, such as SPOT Suite developed by Tull’s group. The session will share best practices, lessons learned and future plans to expand this effort.

Also at the conference, ESnet’s Brian Tierney will speak in a session oh “perfSONAR: Meeting the Community’s Needs.” Co-developed by ESnet, perfSONAR is a tool for end-to-end monitoring and troubleshooting of multi-domain network performance. The session will give an overview of the perfSONAR project, including an overview of the 3.4 release, a preview of the 3.5 release, an overview of the product plan, and an overview of perfSONAR training plan.

ESnet’s Tierney, Zurawski to Present at Workshop on perfSONAR Best Practices


ESnet’s Brian Tierney and Jason Zurawski will be the featured speakers at a workshop on “perfSONAR Deployment Best Practices, Architecture, and Moving the Needle.” The Jan. 21-22 workshop, one in a series of Focused Technical Workshops organized by ESnet and Internet2, will be held at the Ohio Supercomputer Center in Columbus. Read more (http://es.net/news-and-publications/esnet-news/2015/esnet-s-tierney-zurawski-to-present-at-workshop-on-perfsonar-best-practices/)

A joint effort between ESnet, Internet2, Indiana University, and GEANT, the pan-European research network, perfSONAR is a tool for end-to-end monitoring and troubleshooting of multi-domain network performance. In January 2014, perfSONAR reached a milestone with 1,000 instances of the diagnostic software installed on networking hosts around the U.S. and in 13 other countries. perfSONAR provides network engineers with the ability to test and measure network performance, as well as to archive data in order to pinpoint and solve service problems that may span multiple networks and international boundaries.

At the workshop, Tierney will give an introduction to perfSONAR and present a session on debugging using the software. Zurawski will talk about maintaining a perfSONAR node, describe some user case studies and success stories, discuss “Pulling it All Together – perfSONAR as a Regional Asset” and conclude with “perfSONAR at 10 Years: Cleaning Networks & Disrupting Operation.”

ESnet's Jason Zurawski and Brian Tierney
ESnet’s Jason Zurawski and Brian Tierney

Latest version of perfSONAR network measurement software not just another incremental update


Since it was first released about five years ago, the perfSONAR network measurement toolkit has provided the research and education networking community with tools for end-to-end monitoring and troubleshooting of multi-domain network performance. And over the years, this ability to diagnose network problems has become increasingly important as research is increasingly collaborative and dependent on sharing large data sets.

The latest release of perfSONAR, version 3.4, gives network engineers access to more data about network performance as well as increased security protections. The new version will be discussed in a session called “perfSONAR 3.4: Not Just another Incremental Update” at the Technical Exchange conference being held from Oct. 19-25 in Indianapolis. perfSONAR is developed by a collaboration between the Department of Energy’s ESnet, Internet2, Indiana University and GEANT, the pan-European research network.

perfSONAR provides network engineers with the ability to test and measure network performance, as well as to archive data in order to pinpoint and solve performance problems that may span multiple networks and international boundaries.

Read the full story.

ESnet Staff to Share Accomplishments, Expertise at Oct. 27-30 Tech Exchange Conference


Berkeley Lab staff from ESnet, NERSC and the IT Division will be among the presenters at the 2014 Technology Exchange, a leading technical event in the global research and education networking community. The annual meeting is co-organized by ESnet and Internet2. The conference will be held Oct. 27-30 in Indianapolis.

Among the topics to be addressed by Berkeley Lab staff are ESnet’s recently announced 100 gigabits-per-second connections to Europe, the newest release of the perSONAR network measurement software library, Science DMZs and cyber security.

The annual meeting brings together a wide range of technical experts to address the challenges facing the research and education networking community as it supports data-intensive research. The conference will be hosted this year by Indiana University.

Read the day-by-day schedule of Berkeley Lab presentations.

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ESnet’s Science DMZ Model Speeds Flow of Cancer Data at University of New Mexico


Data from the University of New Mexico’s Cancer Center next-generation genome sequencers is now flying across a 10 Gbps link to the university’s Center for Advanced Research Computing, thanks to the Science DMZ model pioneered by ESnet, according to an article posted by UNM.

According to the article, “This point-to-point connection is a first step toward establishing a campus-wide research network at UNM. The connection is based on the “Science DMZ” model formalized by the Department of Energy’s ESnet in 2010. The new link delivers a low-latency, high-bandwidth, unfiltered connection via UNM’s campus network.”

The article states that the new 10 Gbps link enables fast, reliable, and secure transfer of enormous genome sequence files from the UNM Cancer Center for analysis and subsequent data warehouse archiving. And the model may pave the way for greater research collaborations across the state.

“This project is part of UNM’s larger direction to collaborate across campuses and expand network infrastructure for research here and statewide,” said Chief Information Officer Gil Gonzales. UNM IT works closely with departments and Centers at UNM, and with research institutions throughout New Mexico, to provide production, commodity, and research network services.

Read the full story at:http://news.unm.edu/news/unm-establishes-science-dmz-network-link-for-genomics-research

Learn more about ESnet’s Science DMZ architecture at: http://fasterdata.es.net/science-dmz/