ESnet to Demonstrate Science DMZ as a Service, Create Virtual Superfacility at GENI Conference


At the twenty-second GENI Engineering Conference being held March 23-26 in Washington, D.C., ESnet staff will conduct a demonstration of the Science DMZ as a service and show how the technique for speeding the flow of large datasets can be created on demand. The conference is tailor-made for the demonstration as GENI, the Global Environment for Network Innovations, provides a virtual laboratory for networking and distributed systems research and education.

The Science DMZ architecture, developed by ESnet, is a specialized network architecture to speed up the flow of large datasets. The Science DMZ is a portion of a network, usually at a university campus, that is configured to take optimal advantage of the campus’ advanced networks. A Science DMZ provides “frictionless” network paths that connect computational power and storage to scientific big data.

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ESnet’s Science DMZ Architecture is Foundation for New Infrastructure Linking California’s Top Research Institutions


The Pacific Research Platform, a cutting-edge research network infrastructure based on ESnet’s Science DMZ architecture, will link together the Science DMZs of dozens of top research institutions in California. The Pacific Research Platform was announced Monday, March 9, at the CENIC 2015 Annual Conference/

The new platform will link the sites via three advanced networks: the Department of Energy’s Energy Science Network (ESnet), CENIC’s California Research & Education Network (CalREN) and Pacific Wave. Initial results for the new infrastructure will be announced in a panel discussion during the conference featuring by Eli Dart (ESnet), John Haskins (UC Santa Cruz), John Hess (CENIC), Erik McCroskey (UC Berkeley), Paul Murray (Stanford), Larry Smarr (Calit2), and Michael van Norman (UCLA).  The presentation will be live-streamed at 4:20 p.m. Pacific Time on Monday, March 9, and can be watched for free at cenic2015.cenic.org.

Science DMZs are designed to create secure network enclaves for data-intensive science and high-speed data transport. The Science DMZ design was developed by ESnet and NERSC.

“CENIC designed CalREN to have a separate network tier reserved for data-intensive research from the beginning, and the development of the Science DMZ concept by ESnet has enabled that to reach into individual laboratories, linking them together into a single advanced statewide fabric for big-science innovation,” said CENIC President and CEO Louis Fox.  “Of course, CENIC itself also functions as a way to create a fabric of innovation by bringing researchers together to share ideas, making the timing of this announcement at our annual conference just right.”

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ESnet Takes Science DMZ Architecture to Pennsylvania R&E Community


Jason Zurawski of ESnet’s Science Engagement team will lead a March 4 webinar on “Upgrading Campus Cyberinfrastructure: An Introduction to the Science DMZ Architecture” for research and education organizations in Pennsylvania.

Zurawski will introduce ESnet’s Science DMZ Architecture, a network design pattern designed to streamline the process of science and improve the outcomes for researchers. Included in this design are network monitoring concepts via the perfSONAR framework, as well as functional components used to manage security and manage the transfer of data. This design pattern has roots in high speed networks at major computing facilities, but is flexible enough to be deployed and used by institutions of any size. This solution has been successfully deployed on numerous campuses involved in the NSF CC-IIE and CC-NIE programs, and is a focus area for the upcoming CC-DNI program.

The workshop is presented by the Keystone Initiative for Network Based Education and Research (KINBER), a not-for-profit membership organization that provides broadband connectivity, fosters collaboration, and promotes the innovative use of digital technologies for the benefit of Pennsylvania.