Enlighten Your Research Global Proposal Deadline June 7


cropped-EYRglobalHeaderCMYK_2015_text1

Would your research project significantly benefit from enhanced global‪ network connectivity? The Enlighten Your Research Program Global (EYR-Global) is seeking such projects and the deadline for proposals is June 7.

The EYR-Global program, sponsored by ESnet and 11 other leading national research and education networks around the globe, was patterned after SURFnet’s successful national Enlighten Your Research competition in the Netherlands and represents an important step forward in helping researchers in all fields to incorporate advanced global research networks to significantly improve discoveries and collaboration.

In 2013, the first inaugural EYR-Global program resulted in four research projects in climate research, life sciences, and computer science receiving awards in the form of network resources and/or engineering consultations to improve the research workflows in each project.

For 2015, EYR-Global is seeking to support even more projects. The two-step proposal process includes review by a panel of judges representing each of the sponsoring organizations. Final EYR-Global proposal projects may have access to:

  • High performance network infrastructures operated by participating NRENs and their partners.
  • Support and consultation with expert network engineers to devise the best end-to-end network connectivity plan to support the proposed research.
  • Commitment from each participating NREN for an agreed level of network resource provisioning and ongoing support during the program period.

»Learn more. »Submit a proposal.

ESnet’s Monga Keynotes Two R&E Network Workshops


I’ll be busy in Brazil next week. Sharing the newsletter article about it with the Blog readers:

ESnet’s Monga Keynotes Two R&E Network Workshops

ESnet’s Chief Technology Officer Inder Monga will keynote two workshops and participate in a panel focusing on research and education (R&E) networks in Brazil next week.

 On May 18, Monga opens the National Research and Education Network Workshop (WRNP) hosted by ESnet’s Brazilian counterpart. RNP logo imagesIn his talk, entitled “R&E Networks: Imagining the next generation,” Monga will focus on new ideas in R&E networks, from technologies like software defined networking (SDN) and named data networking (NDN) to collaborative architectures to build an internet of different capabilities for global science collaborations. He will also showcase the challenges R&E networks face and focus on enabling end-to-end architectures, including concepts like the Science DMZ.

On May 22, Monga opens the Experimental Research Workshop of the Future Internet (WPIEF). His keynote is entitled “Moving from SDN demo to operations: Challenges.”

Both workshops are held as part of the Brazilian Symposium on Computer Networks  and Distributed Systems (SBRC) conference where Monga will contribute to a May 19 panel discussing “Challenges in the Development of Network Infrastructure, Testbeds for Software Defined Networks.”

BioTeam and ESnet Partner on Science DMZ Webinar


BioTeam and ESnet are partnering to offer a webinar on the Science DMZ architectural paradigm.  While streamlining a network design to facilitate “friction free” research paths, the Science DMZ has been widely adopted by the research and education (R&E) community and is being implemented at many locations around the world.  Using this approach, the task of data mobility becomes less of a mystery, and more of a routine part of scientific networks.  

This event will occur on Monday, May 18th, between 2pm and 4pm EDT and is open to the general public.  We would like to encourage network operators and researchers (including, but not limited to, life science researchers) to attend this no-cost event.  For complete information on registration and logistical details, visit: http://bioteam.net/2015/04/science-dmz-101/. Registration will close when the number of registration slots has been exhausted.

BioTeam is a high-performance consulting practice. They are dedicated to delivering objective, technology agnostic solutions to life science researchers by leveraging technologies customized for scientific objectives.

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified network built to support scientific research. ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, and peers with over 140 research and commercial networks.

Energy Secretary Moniz Honors ESnet’s OSCARS Bandwidth Reservation Service


Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz has recognized ESnet staff members with a DOE Secretarial Honor Award for their development of OSCARS, the On-demand Secure Circuits and Reservation System. OSCARS is a software service that creates dedicated bandwidth channels for scientists who need to move massive, time-critical data sets around the world.

The Secretarial Honor Awards are the department’s highest form of non-monetary employee recognition. Individual and team awardees are selected by the Secretary of Energy. Secretary Moniz presented the 2015 DOE Secretarial Honor Awards during a special program held May 8 at DOE headquarters in Washington, D.C. ESnet staff who received the award are William E. Johnston, Evangelos Chaniotakis, Chin P. Guok, Andrew Lake, Inder Monga, Eric Pouyoul and Mary Thompson.

“This is truly a great honor for the ESnet team and we’re gratified by the Secretary’s recognition of the important role networking plays in scientific discovery,” said ESnet Director Greg Bell.

Read more. 

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Berkeley Lab Staff to Present Super-facility Science Model at Internet2 Conference


Berkeley Lab staff from five divisions will share their expertise in a panel discussion on “Creating Super-facilities: a Coupled Facility Model for Data-Intensive Science at the Internet2 Global Summit to be held April 26-30 in Washington, D.C. The panel was organized by Lauren Rotman of ESnet and includes Alexander Hexemer of the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Craig Tull of CRD, David Skinner of NERSC and Rune Stromsness of the IT Division.

The session will highlight the concept of a coupled science facility or “super-facility,” a new model that links together experimental facilities like the ALS with computing facilities like NERSC via a Science DMZ architecture and advanced workflow and analysis software, such as SPOT Suite developed by Tull’s group. The session will share best practices, lessons learned and future plans to expand this effort.

Also at the conference, ESnet’s Brian Tierney will speak in a session oh “perfSONAR: Meeting the Community’s Needs.” Co-developed by ESnet, perfSONAR is a tool for end-to-end monitoring and troubleshooting of multi-domain network performance. The session will give an overview of the perfSONAR project, including an overview of the 3.4 release, a preview of the 3.5 release, an overview of the product plan, and an overview of perfSONAR training plan.

ESnet to Demonstrate Science DMZ as a Service, Create Virtual Superfacility at GENI Conference


At the twenty-second GENI Engineering Conference being held March 23-26 in Washington, D.C., ESnet staff will conduct a demonstration of the Science DMZ as a service and show how the technique for speeding the flow of large datasets can be created on demand. The conference is tailor-made for the demonstration as GENI, the Global Environment for Network Innovations, provides a virtual laboratory for networking and distributed systems research and education.

The Science DMZ architecture, developed by ESnet, is a specialized network architecture to speed up the flow of large datasets. The Science DMZ is a portion of a network, usually at a university campus, that is configured to take optimal advantage of the campus’ advanced networks. A Science DMZ provides “frictionless” network paths that connect computational power and storage to scientific big data.

Read more.

ESnet’s Science DMZ Architecture is Foundation for New Infrastructure Linking California’s Top Research Institutions


The Pacific Research Platform, a cutting-edge research network infrastructure based on ESnet’s Science DMZ architecture, will link together the Science DMZs of dozens of top research institutions in California. The Pacific Research Platform was announced Monday, March 9, at the CENIC 2015 Annual Conference/

The new platform will link the sites via three advanced networks: the Department of Energy’s Energy Science Network (ESnet), CENIC’s California Research & Education Network (CalREN) and Pacific Wave. Initial results for the new infrastructure will be announced in a panel discussion during the conference featuring by Eli Dart (ESnet), John Haskins (UC Santa Cruz), John Hess (CENIC), Erik McCroskey (UC Berkeley), Paul Murray (Stanford), Larry Smarr (Calit2), and Michael van Norman (UCLA).  The presentation will be live-streamed at 4:20 p.m. Pacific Time on Monday, March 9, and can be watched for free at cenic2015.cenic.org.

Science DMZs are designed to create secure network enclaves for data-intensive science and high-speed data transport. The Science DMZ design was developed by ESnet and NERSC.

“CENIC designed CalREN to have a separate network tier reserved for data-intensive research from the beginning, and the development of the Science DMZ concept by ESnet has enabled that to reach into individual laboratories, linking them together into a single advanced statewide fabric for big-science innovation,” said CENIC President and CEO Louis Fox.  “Of course, CENIC itself also functions as a way to create a fabric of innovation by bringing researchers together to share ideas, making the timing of this announcement at our annual conference just right.”

Read more.

ESnet Takes Science DMZ Architecture to Pennsylvania R&E Community


Jason Zurawski of ESnet’s Science Engagement team will lead a March 4 webinar on “Upgrading Campus Cyberinfrastructure: An Introduction to the Science DMZ Architecture” for research and education organizations in Pennsylvania.

Zurawski will introduce ESnet’s Science DMZ Architecture, a network design pattern designed to streamline the process of science and improve the outcomes for researchers. Included in this design are network monitoring concepts via the perfSONAR framework, as well as functional components used to manage security and manage the transfer of data. This design pattern has roots in high speed networks at major computing facilities, but is flexible enough to be deployed and used by institutions of any size. This solution has been successfully deployed on numerous campuses involved in the NSF CC-IIE and CC-NIE programs, and is a focus area for the upcoming CC-DNI program.

The workshop is presented by the Keystone Initiative for Network Based Education and Research (KINBER), a not-for-profit membership organization that provides broadband connectivity, fosters collaboration, and promotes the innovative use of digital technologies for the benefit of Pennsylvania.

ESnet Opens 40G perfSONAR Host for Network Performance Testing


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ESnet has deployed the first public 40Gbps production perfSONAR host directly connected to an R&E backbone network, allowing research organizations to test and diagnose the performance of network links up to 40 gigabits per second.

The host, located in Boston, Mass., is available to any organization in the R&E (research and education) networking community. More and more, organizations are setting up their own 40 Gbps data transfer nodes to help systems keep up with the increasing size of research datasets.

Read more.

Across the Universe: Cosmology Data Management Workshop Draws Stellar Crowd


CrossConnects1ESnet’s Eli Dart (left), Salman Habib (center) of Argonne National Lab and Joel Brownstein of the University of Utah compare ideas during a workshop break.

ESnet and Internet2 hosted last week’s CrossConnects Workshop on “Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology,” a two-day meeting ESnet Director Greg Bell described as the best one yet in the series. More than 50 members of the cosmology and networking research community turned out for the event hosted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, while another 75 caught the live stream from the workshop.

The Feb. 10-11 workshop provided a forum for discussing the growing data challenges associated with the ever-larger cosmological and observational data sets, which are already reaching the petabyte scale. Speakers noted that network bandwidth is no longer the bottleneck into the major data centers, but storage capacity and performance from the network to storage remain a challenge. In addition, network connectivity to telescope facilities is often limited and expensive due to the remote location of the facilities. Science collaborations use a variety of techniques to manage these issues, but improved connectivity to telescope sites would have a significant scientific benefit in many cases.

In his opening keynote talk, Peter Nugent of Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division said that astrophysics is transforming from a data-starved to a data-swamped discipline. Today, when searching for supernovae, one object in the database consists of thousands of images, each 32 MB in size. That data needs to be processed and studied quickly so when an object of interest is found, telescopes around the world can begin tracking it in less than 24 hours, which is critical as the supernovae are at their most visible for just a few weeks. Specialized pipelines have been developed to handle this flow of images to and from NERSC.

Salman Habib of Argonne National Laboratory’s High Energy Physics and the Mathematics and Computer Science Divisions opened the second day of the workshop, focused on cosmology simulations and workflows. Habib leads DOE’s Computation-Driven Discovery for the Dark Universe project. Habib pointed out that large-scale simulations are critical for understanding observational data and that the size and scale of simulation datasets far exceed those of observational data. “To be able to observe accurately, we need to create accurate simulations,” he said. Simulations will soon create 100 petabyte sets of raw data, and the limiting factor for handling these will be the amount of available storage, so smaller “snapshots” of the datasets will need to be created. And while one person can run the simulation itself, analyzing the resulting data will involve the whole community.

Reijo Keskitalo of Berkeley Lab’s Computational Cosmology Center described how computational support for the Planck Telescope has relied on HPC to generate the largest and most complete simulation maps of the cosmic microwave background, or CMB. In 2006, the project was the first to run on all 6,000 CPUs of Seaborg, NERSC’s IBM flagship at the time. It took six hours on the machine to produce one map. Now, running on 32,000 CPUs on Edison, the project can generate 10,000 maps in just one hour.

Mike Norman, head of the San Diego Supercomputer Center, offered that high performance computing can become distorted by “chasing the almighty FLOP,” or floating point operations per second. “We need to focus on science outcomes, not TOP500 scores.”

Over the course of the workshop, ESnet Director Greg Bell noted that observation and simulation are no longer separate scientific endeavors.

The workshop drew a stellar group of participants. In addition to the leading lights mentioned above, attendees included Larry Smarr, founder of NCSA and current leader of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, a $400 million academic research institution jointly run by the University of California, San Diego and UC Irvine; and Ian Foster, who leads the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and is a senior scientist at Argonne National Lab. Foster is also recognized as one of the inventors of grid computing.

The next step for the workshop organizers is to publish a report and identify areas for further study and collaboration. Looming over them will be the thoughts of Steven T. Myers of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory after describing the data challenges coming with the Square Kilometer Array radio telescope: “The future is now. And the data is scary. Be afraid. But resistance is futile.”